NewsVote 2020

Actions

Florida Amendments: What to know before you vote

Posted at 3:29 PM, Oct 13, 2020
and last updated 2020-10-13 15:29:28-04

We’re about three weeks away from the election and Florida voters will decide on six state constitutional amendments when they cast their ballots. Today, we’ll break down those amendments for you.

If you’re unsure whether you’re going to cast a “yes” or “no” vote, president of the League of Women Voters in Miami-Dade, Monica Skoko-Rodriguez, explains what each amendment means:

Starting with Amendment 1. This would change one word of the state Constitution regarding who can vote in the state.

“A vote yes would place the word ‘every’ to ‘only’ a citizen when speaking about who can vote. A vote 'no' would leave the current constitutional language that every citizen may vote,” said Monica Skoko Rodriguez, President of the League of Women Voters in Miami-Dade.

Amendment 2 would incrementally increase the minimum wage of Florida workers from $8.56 an hour to $10 an hour. Then incrementally $1 a year until 2026.

Amendment 3 would open Florida’s closed primary elections for state legislators, governor and Cabinet officials.

“A a vote ‘yes’ would establish a top two open primary, you might know it as a “jungle primary”, or primary elections for state legislatures, governor and the cabinet. A ‘no’ would keep the current system of closed primaries held by each political party,” said Monica.

Amendment 4 requires constitutional amendments to be approved by 60% of Florida voters twice in two separate elections.

Amendment 5 gives a person two years to transfer “Save Our Home” benefits, in homestead property tax exemptions, over to a new home.

“A vote ‘yes ‘would extend the period of transfer for the “Save Our Homs” to three years from two years and a vote ‘no’ would keep it the same at two years,” added Monica.

Amendment 6 would transfer Homestead Property Tax discounts for veterans with permanent combat-related disabilities to their surviving spouse.

“This amendment would extend that Homestead Property Tax discount to the spouses of certain deceased veterans who had that permanent combat-related disability and a vote would extend that discount and a vote no would not extend that property tax discount,” said Monica.

You can find more details on the amendments, click here.

If you are mailing out your ballot, there’s still time. Here are some important dates to remember:

  • The last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot is October 24th
  • It’s recommended to mail out your ballot by October 19th
  • Once early voting is done, you have until 7pm on Election Day to drop your ballot at your county’s SOE offices.

Virginia and North Carolina Election Resources

Key Dates and Deadlines

North Carolina

Oct. 9: Voter Registration Deadline Oct. 15-Oct. 31: Early Voting Oct. 27: Request Absentee/Mail-In Ballot Deadline Nov. 3: Absentee/Mail-In Postmark by Date Nov. 3: In-Person Voting

Virginia

Oct. 13: Voter Registration Deadline Sept. 18-Oct. 31: Early Voting Oct. 23: Request Absentee/Mail-In Ballot Deadline Nov. 3: Absentee/Mail-In Postmark by Date Nov. 3: In-Person Voting