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YouTube requiring creators to label 'realistic' AI content

The platform says a disclosure is required for "content a viewer could easily mistake for a real person, place, or event."
YouTube requiring creators to label 'realistic' AI content
Posted at 5:10 PM, Mar 19, 2024

YouTube is now requiring creators to label "realistic"-looking content made with altered media, including artificial intelligence.

YouTube said this pertains to "content a viewer could easily mistake for a real person, place, or event." 

A new tool in the Creator Studio will require YouTubers to disclose the modified content, YouTube said in a blog post.

"The new label is meant to strengthen transparency with viewers and build trust between creators and their audience," the post states.

YouTube lists three types of content that will need to be labeled: using the likeness of a realistic person, altering footage of real events or places and generating realistic scenes.

YouTube acknowledged that creators use AI tools for productivity and clarified that it will not require a label in those instances, such as using tools to generate scripts, content ideas or automate captions.

The platform also said it would not require disclosure in instances in which content is unrealistic — such as an animation or a person riding a unicorn in a made-up land — or when modifications are inconsequential, such as color adjustments, special effects or beauty filters and enhancements.

Users will be able to read about how a video was made by looking under the clip's description. A white box will feature the statement, "How this content was made." Users will then see whether it was flagged for being altered or synthetic. 

This move from YouTube comes amid ongoing concerns about artificial intelligence, which has been used in the past to imitate the likenesses of celebrities, politicians and real people to create convincing images and videos of things that were never said or done.

Users can expect to begin seeing the labels in the coming weeks. 

SEE MORE: Tech companies sign pact to fight against AI election disruption


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